Posts Tagged “Swimming”

Comments Off on Active Lifeguarding Saves Lives!

Active Lifeguarding Saves Lives!

Posted by | January 13, 2019 | Drowning Prevention, Lifeguard Jobs, Lifeguards, Water Safety

By USA Management

We have all seen the cliché of the lifeguard sitting in the stand with dark sunglasses, relaxed, a rescue tube nearby and twirling their whistle. The chances are strong that you may believe that is the job of a lifeguard. Well, the times have changed. Newton’s First Law of Motion states that a body at rest will remain at rest, unless an outside force acts on it, and a body in motion will remain in motion.  Our understanding of the physiological impact of motion as it relates to water safety and lifeguards has evolved. We believe that lifeguards can help drastically change the drowning statistics using three primary tools.

  1. Active lifeguarding
  2. Parents Supervising their children
  3. Risk management – (Who can/cannot swim)

The overwhelming reality is that nearly 3,600 people unintentionally drown annually in the United States alone. One in five drownings are children under the age of 14. Children between the ages of 1-4 years old are the second leading cause of death. The lifeguard industry must adapt and get Serious On Safety™ (SOS). Research and training enhancements are leading aquatic professionals to embrace a new lifeguarding mantra that is called ”Active Lifeguarding”. What is Active Lifeguarding? A certified swimmer who constantly is in a state of motion enforcing water safety rules and ready to assist patrons that have a need.

A lifeguard’s main responsibility is to enforce water safety rules by encouraging parents to be responsible for their child’s safety. If an incident were to occur around water or at an aquatic facility a lifeguard training is in proving first response to a victim. Parents Supervise – Lifeguards Save Lives!  A lifeguards success deeply depends on having a fresh mind and a constant awareness of who can and cannot swim. Children are not the only high risks around water. Many adults are non-swimmers or have poor swimming abilities. Understanding that a lifeguards focus is observing swimmers within their zone requires regular awareness and parental supervision. Historically lifeguards sit in a chair and watch. Now Active Lifeguarding relies on the physical movement of a lifeguard as well as the changing of body position while moving their eyes along every square foot of their zone to maintain focus on each swimmer as well as identifying their highest risk. Each lifeguard should take measured deliberate paces from their station, 20 paces to the left and 20 paces to the right, while scanning their zone.  Most importantly a lifeguard must always identify their highest risks and address each risk in a proactive manner. EXAMPLE: If a lifeguard is actively scanning their zone and identifies a non-swimmer without a parent or a guardian providing touch-supervision than that lifeguard would take action by having the identified non-swimmer removed from the water until proper touch-supervision is provided. Lifeguards are NOT “water-sitters”. Active lifeguarding techniques help to keep lifeguards in an alert and ready position allowing them a quicker response time should an incident arise. As the lifeguard actively moves within their station while scanning their zone with full body motion of pacing, counting swimmers, identifying who can swim and locate their highest risk water users breaks up the monotony of a rotation and allows their mind to remain focused on task of enforcing water safety rules. It is imperative for children that cannot swim or are poor swimmers to be properly supervised by their parents at all times! This active approach has drastically reduced the need for lifeguard stands and, in most cases, eliminates the need for one.

Parental supervision and identifying non-swimmers are critical to drowning reduction. As research has shown the majority of drowning victims cannot swim. When patrons enter a swimming facility a lifeguard team cannot assume that patrons will make safe decisions. Furthermore, lifeguards cannot assume that everyone can swim. Due to the aforementioned facts and statistics, it is recommended that all children under 14 years old must be tested to identify their swimming skills. After each child is tested for their swimming skills then each child should be “tagged” and recorded. A red or yellow armband tag usually denotes non-swimmers and therefore must have proper parental or guardian supervision. A green armband tag usually denotes unrestricted swimming and then should be within their parents or guardians site and swim with a buddy (the buddy system). This mandatory screening allows the lifeguard staff to manage the water responsibly by enforcing touch-supervision for non-swimmers. Equally important to incident response is incident prevention. This process of screening and identifying risk empowers lifeguards to be more effective in doing their duty.

These techniques allow lifeguards to make overall risk management decisions on how to safely protect swimmers and non-swimmers in and around water. Facility operators when equipped with these basic principles will be able to structure various areas to allow everyone to enjoy water safely. In order to assist facilities and promote water safety awareness in communities signage and literature should be visual posted and engaging to help explain these important methods.  To help promote water safety awareness aquatic facilities should have proper signage and literature to help explain the importance of these methods. Educating children and making parents aware of the dangers in and around water will help empower your lifeguard staff. Watch Around Water™ (WAW) is a good resource to use in helping raise awareness for the safety of children in and around water. Understanding that the solution to attacking the drowning statistics starts with awareness and compelling parents to be accountable for their children, especially around water. The old adage that “Safety starts at home” is very true. The undeniable solution for risk management is to test all children under 14, properly identify swimmer and non-swimmer, label them properly to allow for easy identification, mandate parental supervision by enforcing touch-supervision, support the buddy system (no swimming alone), and finally implement Active Lifeguarding practices for your lifeguards/first responders to manage swim zones in an alert, focused, motion driven, actively engaging water scanning routine.

USA Managment

usamanagement.com

Comments Off on FINIS SIGNS 2X OLYMPIAN LIA NEAL

FINIS SIGNS 2X OLYMPIAN LIA NEAL

Posted by | January 9, 2019 | Black Swimmers, Swimmers

We simplify swimming through innovation, high-quality products and a commitment to education.

FINIS SIGNS 2X OLYMPIAN LIA NEAL

Livermore, CA (January 9, 2019) FINIS, Inc., the worldwide leader in technical swimming innovation, is proud to announce the signing of two-time Olympian Lia Neal. The New York native and Stanford alum signed a long-term deal with the leading swim brand that extends through the 2020 Olympic Games.


“I am extremely excited for the opportunity to join the FINIS family. The future’s looking bright for FINIS. I could not be happier to be part of this team on its upward trajectory through 2020 and beyond.” says Neal. 


“We are very proud to support an athlete like Lia,” says CEO and cofounder John Mix. “She has the character, work ethic and potential that we look for in every member of Team FINIS. Lia puts her whole heart into this sport and that’s what we need in our athletes—they are our closest partners in developing the best products in the world.”


Neal started her impressive career at an early age. She has continually excelled, nationally and internationally, since competing in her first Olympic Trials at age 13.


Neal made history on the global stage in 2012, becoming the first woman of African American descent to become a two-time Olympian and swim in an Olympic final for Team USA. As a star sprinter at Stanford, Neal played a vital role in setting multiple American records and winning national titles, finishing her career as team captain of Stanford’s 2017 NCAA Championship team.
Most recently, Neal emerged from World Championships in Hangzhou, China, with four medals, including a gold medal in the 4×100 alongside a fellow member of Team FINIS, Olivia Smoliga.


“I admire everything Lia represents as an athlete,” says national sales manager Keith Jizmejian. “She’s not only committed to improving her own performance, but also improving access to the sport. Lia’s values stood out to us very early on in the process.”


Neal is a major proponent for improving education and access to swimming in the U.S. and internationally. In 2017 and 2018, Neal led swim clinics around the globe, including in the U.S., China, Hong Kong, Mexico and Singapore.  Further, she recently launched Swim Brooklyn, an initiative to raise awareness about swimming in her home community.


Neal is currently training with David Marsh and Team Elite in San Diego, California.


We’re just getting started,” says Mix. “In launching the Rival 2.0, it was our explicit goal to make a suit that would impress the best athletes in the world. Lia joining the team is just one of the many indicators that the Rival 2.0 is that suit. Working with someone of Lia’s caliber is an exciting step for our team and we intend to maintain every bit of this momentum going into 2020.”


About FINIS, Inc.
John Mix and Olympic gold medal swimmer Pablo Morales founded FINIS in Northern California in 1993 with a mission to simplify swimming for athletes, coaches, beginners and lifelong swimmers around the world. Today, FINIS fulfills that mission through innovation, high-quality products and a commitment to education. FINIS products are currently available in over 80 countries. With a focus on innovation and the fine details of swimming, FINIS will continue to develop products that help more people enjoy the water.

PRESS CONTACT
Keith Jizmejian
kjizmejian@FINISinc.com
USA +1 (925) 454-0111
EU +359 2 936 86 36

CONTACT FOR LIA NEAL
Cejih Yung, Agent
cejih@cgsportsmanagement.com
CG Sports Management

Comments Off on When Do You Know It’s Time to Quit? – Swimming World Magazine

When Do You Know It’s Time to Quit? – Swimming World Magazine

Posted by | November 7, 2017 | Uncategorized

Photo Courtesy: Peter H. Bick

Commentary by Jason Tillotson, Swimming World College Intern. Swimming is a complicated sport. It is so pure, so natural and innate yet, at the same time, it can be tremendously complex. Swimming is nothing more than the games we all played as children on the playground. It is nothing more than “hey, I’ll race you to the slide and back” and whoever won, would be top-dog, head honcho, the real deal. However, like a clock, on the outside it may seem as simple as any other mundane exercise routine but on the inside, there are many moving parts, each affecting the other. Nothing stands alone, in a clock or in swimming.Everything has a reaction, everything is intertwined. The tiniest of mistakes, however meaningless they seem, add up to the hundredths and tenths swimmers try and eliminate each time they dive in. All the hours, staring at a stiff black line, diving into to a skin-piercingly cold pool all in attempts to shave hundredths of a second off a personal record or to beat a sworn nemesis from the opposition’s side of the deck.  Read More…

Source: https://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/

Comments Off on Baring It All: Why Boys Swam Naked In Chicago High Schools | WBEZ

Baring It All: Why Boys Swam Naked In Chicago High Schools | WBEZ

Posted by | September 26, 2017 | Swimming

OK, imagine you’re a 14-year-old boy. You’ve just started your freshman year at a brand new high school. You’re self conscious and worried about fitting in. Then, your gym teacher tells you to strip naked and walk onto the pool deck with your nude male classmates. Yes, those same classmates you sit next to in math.It’s hard to imagine that any high school would require boys to swim naked today. But for more than 50 years (even until 1980, by some accounts), this was standard policy at public high schools in Chicago and across the country.   Curious City  listener Michael San Filippo grew up hearing stories about what it was like from his dad.“We just could not really believe that that was something they did,” he says.Michael and several other listeners have sent questions to Curious City asking for more information about the school policy. Specifically, Michael asked: Why did Chicago boys swim naked in high school? How did that start and why did it stop? And was it unique to Chicago?

Curious City asked Chicago Public Schools for data and information about the nude swimming policy multiple times, but officials did not respond to multiple requests.  So, we turned to documents, archivists, former CPS coaches, and former students to piece together what the practice was like, why schools required it, what effect it had on students, and how it finally ended.  The search for answers revealed a lot about the limits of early 20th-century pool-filtration technology and the way American society’s attitudes have changed on personal hygiene, privacy, sexuality, and gender. It also uncovered a mountain of anger, confusion, and anxiety among some former students who still wonder why school officials made them swim naked while their female counterparts got to wear suits in separate classes.

Why boys were required to swim nude    

So, was there a good reason to make teenage boys swim naked while their female counterparts got to wear suits?    To find an answer, it helps to know a few things about the history of public swimming pools and the evolving views on personal hygiene.  During the 1920s, YMCAs and schools were building pools across the country for fitness and to teach swimming. Drowning was a big problem at the time.The country was also obsessed with fighting disease and promoting personal hygiene, which in the 1920s, was also associated with “good morals.”  Health officials worried that allowing potentially dirty fabrics into public pools could introduce germs, and bacteria-killing pool chlorination had still not been perfected.   Plus, at the time, swimming pools had fairly primitive filters that could easily be clogged by fabric fibers from swimsuits, which were made of cotton and wool – yes wool.   So, in an effort to minimize bacteria, keep pool filters from clogging and ensure male swimmers were clean, the American Public Health Association (APHA) recommended the following in their 1926 standards handbook:   Read More….

Source: WBEZ

Comments Off on Michael Phelps, Nicole Johnson Tie The Knot With Family and Friends 

Michael Phelps, Nicole Johnson Tie The Knot With Family and Friends 

Posted by | November 3, 2016 | Uncategorized

Michael Phelps and Nicole Johnson held their official wedding ceremony on October 29, 2016 while away at a beach location.

Source: Michael Phelps, Nicole Johnson Tie The Knot With Family and Friends – Swimming World News

Comments Off on Tupelo Aquatic Center starts swimming exercise program for veterans 

Tupelo Aquatic Center starts swimming exercise program for veterans 

Posted by | September 10, 2016 | Aquatic Center

By Zack Orsborn Daily Journal TUPELO – As a U.S. Navy veteran and swimmer, Tom Murry, a water safety instructor at the Tupelo Aquatic Center, feels most at home submerged in water. Murry served in the Navy from 1969 to 1971, taking cruises in Southeast Asia and the Mediterranean. As he got older, the aches […]

Source: Tupelo Aquatic Center starts swimming exercise program for veterans – Daily Journal

Comments Off on Ryan Lochte back on track after U.S. Trials speed bumps | NBC Olympics

Ryan Lochte back on track after U.S. Trials speed bumps | NBC Olympics

Posted by | June 29, 2016 | U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials

After a few speed bumps on his road to Rio, Ryan Lochte appears back on track at U.S. Olympic Swimming Trials.

Source: Ryan Lochte back on track after U.S. Trials speed bumps | NBC Olympics

Comments Off on Ohio teen dies after contracting brain-eating amoeba while swimming | WDTN

Ohio teen dies after contracting brain-eating amoeba while swimming | WDTN

Posted by | June 22, 2016 | Swimming

An Ohio teen has died after contracting a brain-eating amoeba while swimming on a church trip.

Source: Ohio teen dies after contracting brain-eating amoeba while swimming | WDTN

Comments Off on Saint John’s University – Johnnie Swimming & Diving Earns Second Straight CSCAA Academic Honor

Saint John’s University – Johnnie Swimming & Diving Earns Second Straight CSCAA Academic Honor

Posted by | June 16, 2016 | Swimming

COLLEGEVILLE, Minn. – The Saint John’s University swimming and diving team received College Swimming Coaches Association of America (CSCAA) Scholar All-America honors for the second consecutive season on Wednesday, June 15. – CSCAA Release

Source: www.gojohnnies.com

Comments Off on Swimming Pool Electrocutions: Two In Critical Condition After Two Separate Tragedies

Swimming Pool Electrocutions: Two In Critical Condition After Two Separate Tragedies

Posted by | May 30, 2016 | Swimming, Swimming Pool

Two separate swimming pool electrocutions over the weekend are bringing attention to a summer safety risk. In the United States, Memorial Day is the unofficial start of summer.

Source: www.inquisitr.com

Comments Off on Stanford Assistant Scott Armstrong Hired as Johns Hopkins’ Head Coach – Swimming World News

Stanford Assistant Scott Armstrong Hired as Johns Hopkins’ Head Coach – Swimming World News

Posted by | May 26, 2016 | Swimming

Johns Hopkins Director of Athletics Tom Calder announced today the appointment of Scott Armstrong as the head men’s and women’s swimming coach. Armstrong replaces George Kennedy, who announced his retirement

Source: Stanford Assistant Scott Armstrong Hired as Johns Hopkins’ Head Coach – Swimming World News

Comments Off on USA Swimming – USA Swimming Teams with Tugg to Arrange “The Last Gold” Film Screenings Nationwide

USA Swimming – USA Swimming Teams with Tugg to Arrange “The Last Gold” Film Screenings Nationwide

Posted by | May 25, 2016 | USA Swimming

Comments Off on USA Swimming, Disney-Pixar ‘Just Keep Swimming’ 05/18/2016

USA Swimming, Disney-Pixar ‘Just Keep Swimming’ 05/18/2016

Posted by | May 20, 2016 | Swim Team, Swimming, USA Swimming, Water Safety

Matt Farrell, USA Swimming’s chief marketing officer, tells “Marketing Daily,” “Dory’s signature line of ‘just keep swimming’ also made it authentic to tie the fun of joining a swim team.”

Source: www.mediapost.com

Comments Off on New Rochelle YMCA Seeks Swimming Program Instructors | New Rochelle Daily Voice

New Rochelle YMCA Seeks Swimming Program Instructors | New Rochelle Daily Voice

Posted by | October 10, 2015 | Uncategorized

Comments Off on Swimming World Rankings

Swimming World Rankings

Posted by | October 8, 2015 | Uncategorized

FINA, the Fédération Internationale de Natation, is the world governing body for the five Aquatic Disciplines of Swimming, Diving, Water Polo, Synchronised Swimming and Open Water Swimming.

Source: Swimming World Rankings

Skip to content